Be Faithful to Christ at the Funeral of a Lost Person

As ambassadors of Christ, we need to be balanced; we must not dare compromise the message, but we must also be respectful and compassionate to those we are sent to. In this excerpt, Mark shares how he sought to be faithful to Christ while sharing at the funeral of a lost person. This excerpt was taken from the full sermon, “Transformation For Proclamation (Part 4)“.

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The Failures of Old Testament Leaders

In this sermon, we look into the Old Testament and see that most of the good leaders start out well but finish badly, suffering moral failures later in their lives. Their sins all seem to fall into four problem areas: 1. Pride. 2. Choosing personal comfort (over personal sacrifice). 3. Putting family relationships first. 4. Friendship with the world. Knowing about their failures should help us avoid the same outcomes and cause us to appreciate the moral perfection of Christ in the Gospel. Gideon (Judges 6-9) Samuel (1 Samuel) David (1-2 Samuel, 1-2 Kings, 1-2 Chronicles) Solomon (1 Kings, 1-2 Chronicles) Asa (1Kings 15, 2 Chronicles 14-16) Jehoshaphat (1 Kings 22, 2 Chronicles 17-20) Uzziah (2 Kings 14, 2 Chronicles 26) Hezekiah (2 Chronicles 29-32, 2 Kings 20)

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What is the Void in Your Life?

Do you believe the lie that your life consists in the abundance of possessions? Have you been deluded into chasing after something in this world thinking it’s going to fill the void in your life? Wake up from that delusion and seek Jesus Christ as your all in all. View the full sermon, “Covetousness: One of Those Respectable Sins“. Covetousness is the desire to have. It’s a desire fed by the belief that my life consists in what I have. My life isn’t going to be right unless I have a certain thing. I’m not living. It’s not really life. I’m not really living unless I have that. It’s that void. What’s the void in your life? The thing that there is this emptiness there. I’ve got to have that. You keep feeling like: Well, if I’m really going to be happy in this world, I have to have that thing. You see, that’s what’s happening here. The man in the parable – what was it he wanted? Many years of relaxing, eating, drinking, being merry. I will, I will, I will… he laid up treasures for himself. The man who wants the inheritance? He has the same mindset. What’s the mindset? That that inheritance was crucial to his life. His happiness hung on it. You see, the man who has a bunch, even more than he knows what to do with, his happiness – he’s got it all calculated – his happiness rests on what he has. This man who doesn’t have, he’s got the same mindset. He’s thinking his life isn’t going to be right as long as his brother’s running around. This isn’t fair. His brother’s got all the cash. He’s got all the goods. He’s got all the possessions. He’s got all the cattle, all the… Read More

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Start the Year with Praise

1 Timothy 1:17 Now to the King eternal, immortal, invisible, the only God, be honor and glory forever and ever. Amen (CSB). At the conclusion of every year, most people conduct at least a casual evaluation of what kind of a year it was for them. Answers range across the whole spectrum from “horribly terrible” to “most excellent”. I can understand the reasons many say, “I’m glad this year is over! I hope the new year will be much better!” My wife and I went through a series of years (2010-2015) that we were glad to see end. Looking back now, I think we can see the hand of God’s blessing on us at all times during those years, even though we suffered. Our Sovereign God was very merciful when it was hard to discern his hand of blessing. And we’re thankful! Regardless of how you and I evaluated the past year, I know how we ought to begin 2020: with joyful praise to the Lord our God! If you had a difficult year, remember to keep the living God in your focus in the new year. If you think last year was great, don’t forget the Father in heaven who has loaded you with benefits. Wherever you are on this spectrum, a godly response will require ongoing repentance and faith. By this I mean that we will need to have our thoughts of the true and living God transformed by his word, and then to trust him each step of the way. It is important to both have our minds renewed (Rm 12:1-2) and to commit ourselves to the Lord. It doesn’t do any good and even is spiritually harmful to say, “I will trust God better this year,” if we have wrong ideas and thoughts about God. For example, can you trust God if… Read More

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Covetousness: One of Those Respectable Sins

Covetousness is a heinous, horrible, damnable sin that will lead to everlasting punishment and unspeakable torment for those who practice it. And isn’t it fearful how few people seem to even realize how wicked this sin is? May God help and keep us from being deceived by covetousness. Ephesians 5:5 – For you may be sure of this, that everyone who is sexually immoral or impure, or who is covetous (that is, an idolater), has no inheritance in the kingdom of Christ and God.

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We Don’t Need a Slow God

One of the effects of believing that the creation account in the Bible took a long time is that it makes God look like a God who acts slowly. But every Christian knows that we don’t need a God who acts slow; we need a mighty God who can act immediately on our behalf. This excerpt was taken from the full sermon, “How Should We Interpret the Creation Account?“.

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Reactions to the Birth of Christ

Matthew 2:1-12 After Jesus was born in Bethlehem in Judea, during the time of King Herod, Magi from the east came to Jerusalem and asked, “Where is the one who has been born king of the Jews? We saw his star when it rose and have come to worship him” (Matthew 2:1-2 NIV). During this Christmas season, our granddaughter, who is almost three, learned the first stanza of the Christmas hymn “We Three Kings”. I think we all rejoice when young children can use their voices to sing the praises of the King of kings. It is always good to sing praises to the Lord, especially when we sing about one of the important events in the history of redemption. When a child sings, it is interesting to listen carefully to their words, since they usually vary from the actual words of the song. When Elise sings this carol, she says, “We five kings….” We smile at her artistic license in departing from the traditional text. She makes no change to the Biblical texts in the number of kings (actually Magi), since Matthew only refers to them in the plural without counting them. Her devotion to singing to the Great King is an example to us all. So now let us turn our minds to worship and consider four reactions to Christ’s birth. One of the key words in our text is the word “worship”. Let’s look at the people mentioned in the text and see how many of them desired to worship Jesus Christ the Lord. Many people were disturbed (2:1-3). The source of much of this disruption came from King Herod. When an oppressive ruler is stirred up about something, others have reason for concern. King Herod had murdered his wife, three sons, a mother-in-law, a brother-in-law, an… Read More

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