Easter

Easter always invites reflection. Think of how divine devotion and human response come together. The Father so loved us that he sent the Son to swallow our death for us. It reveals how he values us. His beloved Son, at the Father’s request, took on our sins at the cross. He tasted our forsakenness and then returned for us to become his eternal companions.

Our proper response is thanksgiving.

There isn’t, of course, a device known as a thank-o-meter that measures the depth and weight of our awareness and delight in response to what God has done for us. Our hearts probably stay stable even when someone calls out, “He is risen!” and the reciprocal call of “He is risen, indeed!” is made.

I reflected on this in a new way in our church service this morning. Alongside our time of singing, praying, and the sermon, the pastor called on us to pray for a teenager, Cole, who went missing late in the week. He attends our church and we’re still waiting for news about him. We’re all afraid for him—he’s not the type who would run away from home.

So many of us feel the weight of Cole’s disappearance and we’re anxious for him to be restored to his family as soon as possible. Think of how his father—who sits next to Cole off to my left on most Sunday church services—will feel if he gets Cole back. His heart will leap for joy and all the thanksgiving any of us can imagine will fill his heart.

Here’s a related reflection. If anyone came to know and love God this morning in light of the Easter message, how did God respond? Would it be more or less than what a human father and mother might feel when a lost child is found and returned? The Bible tells us that angels in heaven will be cheering, along with God.

So tonight I’m very thankful for a Father who loves us so very much: who found me, along with many others, and brought us home. And I’m praying for Cole and his family to be reunited.

Thank you, oh Lord, for caring as much as you do.

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About R N Frost

R N (Ron) Frost is a student of history, especially the history of Christian spirituality. Ron served for more than 20 years at a Portland, OR, college and seminary. At the seminary, from 1995-2007, he was a professor of historical theology and ethics. Ron is now a pastoral care consultant with Barnabas International. In this role he provides care, coaching, encouragement, and educational services to those in overseas cross-cultural ministries. This involves a number of trips to worldwide destinations each year, each by invitation. All his services are gratis, so ministry partners are needed and welcomed. Go to Barnabas International for more information about this unique ministry and for a link that offers support options.