Biggest Big Ideas – Spreading Goodness & Hope

 

So God’s character is reflected
throughout the canon of Scripture.

 
Ideas 8 & 9
Goodness.
I suspect there is something of a story even in the sequence of big thematic ideas I am pondering in this series.  God, creation, sin, grace, faith, redemption, community, and building on last time:
God’s character is marked by a certain spreading goodness that moves outwards to us and to all nations, rather than the self-oriented glory grab we might expect.
It is strange that we have expectations of God.  If it weren’t for His self-revelation we would know nothing.  Yet somehow we can easily assume we know quite a lot, even apart from the Bible.  So we take the speculative notions of the classical Greek theologians and voila, a bank of knowledge about the supreme being.
If we would just listen to the Bible we would surely hear something different.
God is not a self-oriented glory hunter. 
He is not some sort of power-obsessed despot creating and playing for his own amusement.  Even though a god made in our image would be self-concerned, the God of the Bible is anything but.
There is no more glorious glimpse into the eternal experience of God than the Son’s prayer in which we discover that the Father and Son are completely concerned with the other, not with self.  There is glory, but it is a far more glorious glory, the glory of a loving giving kind, the biblical God kind.  And even the prayer is a prayer for others to share in that eternal experience!
It is the outward moving motivation of God’s love that makes sense of creation rather than non-creation. 
It is the spreading goodness of God that makes sense of mercy triumphing over judgment.  It is the overflowing and giving character of God that makes sense of His missionary mindset – in the sending of His Son, in the Son’s sending of His followers, and in His going with us.
It is the revealing, speaking, good God of Isaiah that wants witnesses to get to the ends of the earth, and His Son, His ultimate revelation, speaking to His followers with a commission in the same language. So God’s character is reflected throughout the canon of Scripture.
God is a giving God, a going God, a to the ends of the earth kind of a God. 
There is nothing grabby about this deity, other alternatives should be set aside in response to the great theme of God’s spreading goodness.
We may have consumed a diet of divinity teaching from the world, or even in the church, that somehow hasn’t felt quite consistent with the Bible.  We need to preach His Word so that others can taste and see that the Lord is good.
 
Hope
I started this series with the note that Haddon Robinson had suggested that the Bible weaves together about ten bigger big ideas.  I’m offering my list, feel encouraged to read the Scriptures and write your own.
We’ve pondered our triune God, His creation, our fall into sin, His grace, our faith, His great work of redemption, resulting in our unity, the spreading giving goodness of God’s plan and now we have two left.  The Bible is saturated with this theme:
A fallen world is a place of despair, yet sin cannot win against our great God, so His people always have hope.
From the very beginning God’s book is a book of hope, because God’s people have a God worth trusting.  Even in the very moment of rebellion, in the sentencing phase of the first ever trial, God gave not punishment, but promise.  The seed of the woman is the hope of a fallen humanity.
Eve thought she had him in the joy of a son born.  The generations passed, but God is not slow in keeping His promise.  The promised one was coming in the line of Shem, of Abraham, of Isaac, of Jacob, of Judah, of Jesse, of David – of the unlikely, of the unholy, of the ordinary people in the line of an extraordinary promise.
The prophets told of the coming servant who would suffer, the coming King who would reign. 
Generations ticked by, but for those with hearts aligned with God’s, hope only grew stronger.  Each father potentially in the line and gazing into his little Jewish boy’s face would wonder.  Finally it was a step-Dad’s little boy, a tiny bundle of life that he carried into the temple courts to be gazed on by two sets of faithful hope-filled aged eyes.
Now we live in light of His coming, and yet we look forward.  Almost every book of the New Testament speaks of the future return of our Christ, the groom coming to take us home to the Father’s house prepared for us.  We live in the shadows between two great spotlights, the appearing of the grace of God, and the appearing of the glory of our great God and Saviour Jesus Christ.  That is our blessed hope.
Some suggest such a hope is a crutch for the weak, or an anesthetic for the hurting. 
The truth is we are so weak we need more than a crutch, but this hope does not dull our senses.  It enlivens us to live this life with hearts beating after His, with eyes to see His faithful loyal love, with ears to hear His word that stirs faith.  Hope transforms the darkest vale of tears, not by a temporary fix, but with the perspective of His forever plan.
The hope of the people of God is not a hope restricted to manageable circumstances or changeable situations.  It is a hope that holds in the face of hellish opposition.  It is a hope that stirs when death seems to own valley of the shadow in which we walk.  It is a hope that steps forward to pay even the greatest price, knowing that it is not we that stand on a slippery slope.
This earth has nothing we desire besides Him.  So we live on this earth gripped by the hope that only a good God would offer.
And we will not be disappointed.  We wait, we live and we die still anticipating a city whose maker and builder is God.  We hail home and do not shrink back, as those looking forward to the homecoming of those bought and washed in precious blood, a community with no trace of sin and its effects.
Yet our hope is not really the city with its perfect architecture and untarnished building materials. 
They are as asphalt compared to the real glory of that city.  For our hope is not merely the place, nor even the privilege of participating in the gathering of the rescued people, our hope is the Person himself in whose presence we will know the fullness of joy – we will be forever with the Lord!
The hope God gives has always gone beyond the where, to the who.
God, who has called you into fellowship with His Son Jesus Christ our Lord, is faithful.
~ Peter
Sine we combined two of Peter’s posts into one….
You can comment on the “goodness” section of Peter’s article here
Or, you can comment on his “hope” section here.
 
Dr Peter Mead
Peter is a Bible teacher and ministry trainer, based in southern England. His main ministry is as co-director and mentor of Cor Deo, a full-time mentored study and ministry training program.  Peter leads the Advanced Bible Teachers Network at the European Leadership Forum.  He holds degrees from Multnomah Biblical Seminary (MDiv/MA), and the Doctor of Ministry degree in homiletics from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, where Dr Haddon Robinson was his mentor.  For more information on Cor Deo, including the weekly theological blog, please visit www.cordeo.org.uk. Peter also authors the BiblicalPreaching.net website for preachers.
Visit Biblical Preaching
Visit Cor Deo

Beyond Guilt – Part 4

 

If you think the Bible offers
instructions for living,
your preaching will reflect that.

 
Some preachers rely exclusively on the pressure tactic of guilt in their preaching.  Surely there must be a more biblically rounded approach?  This week I’ve suggested we need to consider our stance, our tone and yesterday, our strategy.  Let me offer the fourth factor today:
The Preacher’s Vision.
Law Preaching leads to DeathEssentially, when we boil it down, what are we offering when we preach?  Ok, the message of the text.  So there will be an individuality to each message since every text is unique.  But what does the Bible offer – even allowing for each text to be its own unique entity in the tapestry of the whole?
If you think the Bible offers instructions for living, your preaching will reflect that.
If you think the Bible offers engaging ancient stories with helpful morals, then your preaching will reflect that.
But if you think the Bible offers a vision of the heart and character and grace and personality of God, then your preaching will reflect that.
To put this another way, what is the good news offered in the Word? 
Is it the good news of a way in which a sinful humanity can now be empowered to live a more righteous life – that is, a gospel that somehow misses God out?  Or is it the good news of who God is, offering a sinful humanity the privilege of relationship with Him who to know is life, and who to know will transform a life?
I wish this were so obvious that I didn’t see the need to write the post, but I have heard sermons where God is essentially, or even actually, omitted and absent.  These are the kind of messages I might see as party political speeches, or “if only people would be good society would be better” messages, etc.  There are many types of speeches in the world today, but the ones where God is at most a bit-part player are not the kind of speeches we need in the church.
If the vision captivating the preacher’s heart is the Law, then the message will likely be a guilt focused message. 
If the vision captivating the preacher’s heart is the grace and love of a loving God, then the message is likely to be more compelling, more transformative.  After all, the gospel involves the transformation of lives from the inside out, not by the pressure of responsibility, but by the attractive invitation to respond to the goodness of our so very good God.
The vision captivating you will show in your preaching, and if it is the vision of the God who reveals Himself throughout His Word, then I suspect you will offer that same vision in your preaching – a vision that alone can truly transform lives.
You can leave a comment for this article on Peter’s blog.
~ Peter Mead
 
[author] [author_image timthumb=’on’]http://christmycovenant.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Peter-Mead.png[/author_image] [author_info]Dr Peter Mead is a Bible teacher and ministry trainer, based in southern England. His main ministry is as co-director and mentor of Cor Deo, a full-time mentored study and ministry training program.  Peter leads the Advanced Bible Teachers Network at the European Leadership Forum.  He holds degrees from Multnomah Biblical Seminary (MDiv/MA), and the Doctor of Ministry degree in homiletics from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, where Dr Haddon Robinson was his mentor.  For more information on Cor Deo, including the weekly theological blog, please visit www.cordeo.org.uk. Peter also authors the BiblicalPreaching.net website for preachers.[/author_info] [/author] [button link=”http://www.biblicalpreaching.net” newwindow=”yes”] Visit Biblical Preaching[/button] [button link=”http://www.cordeo.org.uk/” newwindow=”yes”] Visit Cor Deo[/button]

Beyond Guilt – Part 3

 

What is our strategy in preaching?

 
So far we have looked at issues of stance and tone in this series.  It is easy to have a minimalist default approach of piling on the pressure and using guilt to twist arms.  The biblical preacher needs to get beyond that.
The Preacher’s Strategy.
Let’s face the real issue head on.  What is our strategy in preaching?  If the goal is life transformation, then what strategy makes sense?  It certainly can’t be a simplistic answer since the human is a complex creature.  But here are some pointers on strategy issues.
Transformation involves movement from a negative to a positive. 
transformationPreaching for that transformation cannot simply critique the negative.  We need to help people see what life would look like if the biblical truth were to take hold.  Simply making people feel bad is not a solution.
Often people simply cannot conceive of what a faith-filled Christ-like in-step-with-the-Spirit life would look like in terms of a specific issue.  In one sense then we have some role as life coaches.  But it is more than that.
Transformation involves motivation for applying the message of God’s Word. 
Preaching for that transformation cannot simply inform, or even pressure, it needs to motivate.  We need to understand how people work at the deepest level.  If we think that information plus pressure will generate good things then we have been significantly led away from the teaching of the Bible by the thinking of this world.
What is the root issue Paul points to in Ephesians 4:17ff?

Ephesians 4:17-24 ESV
Now this I say and testify in the Lord, that you must no longer walk as the Gentiles do, in the futility of their minds. [18] They are darkened in their understanding, alienated from the life of God because of the ignorance that is in them, due to their hardness of heart. [19] They have become callous and have given themselves up to sensuality, greedy to practice every kind of impurity. [20] But that is not the way you learned Christ!—[21] assuming that you have heard about him and were taught in him, as the truth is in Jesus, [22] to put off your old self, which belongs to your former manner of life and is corrupt through deceitful desires, [23] and to be renewed in the spirit of your minds, [24] and to put on the new self, created after the likeness of God in true righteousness and holiness.

People act and behave a certain way because of their thinking – so we need to educate!  Hang on, yes we do, but he goes further, there’s a deeper issue…the root issue is the hardness of heart.  Somehow the heart influences even how the mind will process information.  Christian transformation is not really about well-informed minds and well-disciplined wills.  It is an issue of the heart, inside to out, a matter of response as opposed to responsibility.
Transformation involves response to more than a vision of better living.  
It is not about realizing innate potential, but about responding from the core to a compelling love that alone can truly transform a life.
So our strategy includes presentation of application rather than just declaration of guilt.  Our strategy includes communicating with people as if they are heart-driven beings and not just informed decision makers.  But the ultimate issue has to be the One to whom people should respond, which I’ll leave until tomorrow’s post.
You can leave a comment for this article on Peter’s blog.
~ Peter Mead
 
[author] [author_image timthumb=’on’]http://christmycovenant.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Peter-Mead.png[/author_image] [author_info]Dr Peter Mead is a Bible teacher and ministry trainer, based in southern England. His main ministry is as co-director and mentor of Cor Deo, a full-time mentored study and ministry training program.  Peter leads the Advanced Bible Teachers Network at the European Leadership Forum.  He holds degrees from Multnomah Biblical Seminary (MDiv/MA), and the Doctor of Ministry degree in homiletics from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, where Dr Haddon Robinson was his mentor.  For more information on Cor Deo, including the weekly theological blog, please visit www.cordeo.org.uk. Peter also authors the BiblicalPreaching.net website for preachers.[/author_info] [/author] [button link=”http://www.biblicalpreaching.net” newwindow=”yes”] Visit Biblical Preaching[/button] [button link=”http://www.cordeo.org.uk/” newwindow=”yes”] Visit Cor Deo[/button]

Beyond Guilt – Part 2

 

Guilt is a poor motivator

 
I am continuing to ponder how to preach with a more nuanced approach than mere guilt pressure.  As I’ve written already, there is a place for genuine conviction of sin, and I am not hiding from that.  But equally, I am not just hiding in that, nor avoiding the danger hiding in a non-nuanced guilt approach.
How can we hide in a guilt approach?
I suspect some see no other way to help lives change than to pile on the pressure.  Every passage is turned into a guilt trip.  Doesn’t matter what tone the passage takes, the message will have been filtered into a guilt and pressure tone.
And what danger is hiding in such an approach?
There is an implicit danger with guilt focused messages.  I say you should feel guilty.  If I convince you, then you feel that you must change.  Guilt alone will not drive people to God.  It will drive them to despair or to efforts of the flesh.  Neither result is good.  Guilt has to come in a package with hope, with grace, with access to life transformation that has to come from God, not from self.
So, yesterday we looked at the issue of stance.  Here’s another element, perhaps an obvious one, but still important nonetheless.
The Preacher’s Tone. 
guilty as chargedToo many people think too simplistically.  As if communication is about information transfer.  But the truth is that communication involves a complex of signals, some of which can override others.  So my body language can contradict, and overwhelm my words.  So too can my vocal presentation.  Voice and body language combine in regards to the tone of my communication.
If my tone is close to that of an angry prophet, that will override the most gracious of poetic content.  If my tone is akin to that of a Victorian school master, then my words, my message, will take on a whole new meaning.
Children know this. 
If a parent says their name with a certain tone, they know they’re supposed to feel guilty.  It’s voice, expression, posture, etc.  But it boils down to tone.
Do you have a default tone that is guilt inducing?  Can you make the most encouraging passage into a pressure text?  Can you turn Psalm 23 into a rebuke for not being a good sheep?  Can you take Jesus’ yoke and burden, which are easy and light, and make them tricky to put on properly if your listeners aren’t living just right?
Let’s be sure that when we preach, it is not just our words that reflect the meaning of the text, but that our tone also reflects the tone of the text, and the tone of the God who is speaking to these people on this occasion.
Stance and tone can be adjusted to avoid a guilt-only approach.  They can be factors in a better motivational methodology.  But tomorrow we’ll zero in on a key factor in preaching to encourage and motivate.
You can leave a comment for this article on Peter’s blog.
~ Peter Mead
 
[author] [author_image timthumb=’on’]http://christmycovenant.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Peter-Mead.png[/author_image] [author_info]Dr Peter Mead is a Bible teacher and ministry trainer, based in southern England. His main ministry is as co-director and mentor of Cor Deo, a full-time mentored study and ministry training program.  Peter leads the Advanced Bible Teachers Network at the European Leadership Forum.  He holds degrees from Multnomah Biblical Seminary (MDiv/MA), and the Doctor of Ministry degree in homiletics from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, where Dr Haddon Robinson was his mentor.  For more information on Cor Deo, including the weekly theological blog, please visit www.cordeo.org.uk. Peter also authors the BiblicalPreaching.net website for preachers.[/author_info] [/author] [button link=”http://www.biblicalpreaching.net” newwindow=”yes”] Visit Biblical Preaching[/button] [button link=”http://www.cordeo.org.uk/” newwindow=”yes”] Visit Cor Deo[/button]

Beyond Guilt

 

Guilt is a poor motivator

 
A friend asked me how we can preach to encourage listeners apart from making them feel guilty.  He and I would both recognize the need for genuine conviction of sin, a work of the Spirit and a feature of some texts (and therefore some messages).  But I understand the need for the question – too much preaching relies too much on guilt as the primary, or even the only, change mechanism.

Beyond Guilt

Guilt is a poor motivator.  The Spirit of God certainly does bring conviction to people, to me.  An absence of conviction of sin in a life is an indication of a real problem.  But there is much more to the Spirit’s work than just conviction of sin.  There is much more to life transformation than guilt.
As I read the Bible I find myself convicted, yes, but also stirred, inspired, encouraged, enlightened, intrigued, reassured, enlivened, thrilled, calmed, galvanized, spurred, moved, attracted, delighted, renewed, transformed, changed.
God uses the Bible to change lives, and He changes lives by more than just guilt.  So how, as a preacher of God’s Word, can I beneficially engage the lives of listeners with more than just a guilt session?
Beginning with this post I’d like to offer several elements of an answer to this question.
The Preacher’s Stance. 
Where do we stand?  Guilt-only approaches tend to take a domineering and confrontational stance.  This comes through sometimes before a word is even spoken.  It shows in demeanour, in expression, in attitude.  It may be justified in terms of the authority of God’s Word, etc., but it is worth rethinking.
I would suggest a stance that is empathetic rather than confrontational, although there is a place for the latter.  I am not suggesting the preacher stands amongst the listeners as a sympathetic fellow-struggler with nothing more than shared struggle.  We do stand with God’s Word and so do have something very profound to offer.  But we also stand as recipients of that Word.
Sometimes our talk of authority can lead us to authoritarian approaches. 
Yes, God’s Word has authority and as I preach God’s Word there is a “thus saith the Lord” aspect.  But it is right here that some betray their narrow view of God and come right back to a guilt-only approach.  That is, they see God as being purely authoritarian and a guilt-approach-only Deity.
Thus saith the Lord. 
We represent Him.  How did God reveal His own character, personality, values, etc.?  On Sinai, through the prophets, in Christ?  God didn’t just come as a pounding fist.
We should consider the stance we take as one standing and speaking God’s Word, while at the same time being one standing as a recipient of God’s Word.  If our stance is simply a “lording it over” stance then we betray a worldly passion for power that reflects a twisted view of God Himself.
In my next post I’ll add another element to consider in pursuing how to preach with more than just guilt.
You can leave a comment for this article on Peter’s blog.
~ Peter Mead
 
[author] [author_image timthumb=’on’]http://christmycovenant.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Peter-Mead.png[/author_image] [author_info]Dr Peter Mead is a Bible teacher and ministry trainer, based in southern England. His main ministry is as co-director and mentor of Cor Deo, a full-time mentored study and ministry training program.  Peter leads the Advanced Bible Teachers Network at the European Leadership Forum.  He holds degrees from Multnomah Biblical Seminary (MDiv/MA), and the Doctor of Ministry degree in homiletics from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, where Dr Haddon Robinson was his mentor.  For more information on Cor Deo, including the weekly theological blog, please visit www.cordeo.org.uk. Peter also authors the BiblicalPreaching.net website for preachers.[/author_info] [/author] [button link=”http://www.biblicalpreaching.net” newwindow=”yes”] Visit Biblical Preaching[/button] [button link=”http://www.cordeo.org.uk/” newwindow=”yes”] Visit Cor Deo[/button]

New Covenant Solutions

 

Five key provisions in the New Covenant

 
Recently we gathered as a group of Cor Deo “graduates” and enjoyed two days on “A Vibrant Faith,” looking at 2Corinthians 1-5 and a bit of Jonathan Edwards.  Essentially we spent two days pondering the New Covenant.  Specifically we thought about the solutions it offers to the human problem.  We also recognized how easily we can fail to engage the fullness of God’s provision.  Let me explain.
Essentially there are five key provisions in the New Covenant.  

We have our sins forgiven.
Our hearts of stone are replaced by hearts of flesh.
The Law is no longer written on tablets of stone, but engraved internally on our hearts.
The Holy Spirit is now poured out on all who are God’s.
And we have a personal, intimate, knowledge of the Lord – we have close relationship with the Triune God!

Strangely, though, many Christians don’t seem to be captivated by the provision of the New Covenant.  It is as if we struggle to see what was wrong with the old way.  So let’s look at it from a different angle.  What was life like under the Old Covenant?  Why was the New Covenant such a big deal in the New Testament?  Why did the prophets look forward to it with eager anticipation?  In fact, why do the books of Moses even look forward to it in the midst of the provision of the Old?
1. Our sin is the great barrier and separation between us and God.  Instead of looking heaven-ward and seeing the face of God shining down on us, we tend to see the bleak foreboding barrier of our sin separating us from God.  Back in their days that meant a constant sacrificial cycle, a perpetual reminder of the need for an atonement that would not just temporarily cover, but finally carry our sins far away.  Of the five points I am going to make here, this is the one that the church tend to focus on.  The great barrier is dealt with by the cross, praise God!  This is where a lot of evangelism begins.  And ends.  There is a mechanism given by God in Christ to remove the barrier!  But this is not an end in itself.  This isn’t just about my now having access to a nicer destiny.  This is part of the package that also includes having the next four issues addressed.  (And when this is the sole focus of our “New Covenant gospel,” then we tend to only half believe even this part.  We end up in a cycle of self-recrimination for the ongoing sin struggle of this life.)
2. Our hearts are the great source of sin, yet they are cold, unresponsive, unfeeling, stone-like.  It can be amazing to read the Old Testament and see the obstinate hardness of heart among those receiving the gracious intervention and patience of God’s steadfast love.  We wonder how they could be like that.  Then we look in the mirror.  Ah, but that is human nature.  That is what humans are like under the Old Covenant.  Hang on, such a statement shouldn’t comfort us!  We shouldn’t be feeling excused for stony hearts.  That is one of the great provisions of the New Covenant.  Yet we too easily dismiss the transformative power of God in our hearts, we dismiss issues of the heart.  We focus on our knowledge and determination, but neglect the heart-to-heart reality of the gospel.  And with hearts ignored, we tend to feel only the pull of the flesh, and we become functional old covenanters.  Which means our spirituality and Christianity defaults back to…
3. Our direction for living is a gracious provision from the finger of God, but it is external, yet requires an inside-out transformation.  With our neglect of God’s transformative work in our hearts, we also fall back into following external codes of conduct.  Instead of looking back to life under the Law and celebrating our new inner desire to please God, we doubt the heart elements of the New Covenant and so feel the need for external law codes.  Any suggestion that we aren’t under the Law brings a reaction of fear – oh dear, you must be promoting sin!  But we prove our lack of faith in God’s greater provision for the sin problem in the New Covenant by pushing back into an Old Covenant approach to the issue (an approach that was always intended to be temporary and preparatory).  Of course, very few Christians will overtly print posters of 613 laws and try to follow them all.  But maybe 10.  Certainly an emphasis on Law in the process of sanctification.
4. Our connection with God is entirely hope-based, when in reality we now have an amazing union with Christ who indwells us by His Spirit.  The Spirit of God used to fall on kings and prophets, for a time and for a task.  Too often today we treat the Spirit as if that is still the way He works – special people for special ministry.  Power displays or particularly gripping preaching is somehow a real anointing, but we travel to them, because we seem resistant to any notion that God has really come into us.
5. Our God is gracious, but often perceived to be a distant and daunting judge.  This post is already too long, but here is the crux of the matter.  If God’s provision for inside-out transformation by the heart transplant and the internalizing of the law is not fully engaged, and if God’s provision for relationship by the giving of His Spirit is not fully engaged, then God will continue to feel distant and essentially daunting.  It is not simply a matter of the sin barrier being removed by Christ.  The New Covenant is ultimately about our delightful and intimate relationship with the Triune God.  God is love, and we are invited.
Embraced by the Trinity, why would we turn from the One who has called us and pull back from any part of this glorious New Covenant?
~ Peter Mead
You can leave a comment for this article on Peter’s blog.
 
[author] [author_image timthumb=’on’]http://christmycovenant.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/Peter-Mead.png[/author_image] [author_info]Dr Peter Mead is a Bible teacher and ministry trainer, based in southern England. His main ministry is as co-director and mentor of Cor Deo, a full-time mentored study and ministry training program.  Peter leads the Advanced Bible Teachers Network at the European Leadership Forum.  He holds degrees from Multnomah Biblical Seminary (MDiv/MA), and the Doctor of Ministry degree in homiletics from Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, where Dr Haddon Robinson was his mentor.  For more information on Cor Deo, including the weekly theological blog, please visit www.cordeo.org.uk. Peter also authors the BiblicalPreaching.net website for preachers.[/author_info] [/author] [button link=”http://www.biblicalpreaching.net” newwindow=”yes”] Visit Biblical Preaching[/button] [button link=”http://www.cordeo.org.uk/” newwindow=”yes”] Visit Cor Deo[/button]